#paramountproblem Post Cards

Postcard_Paramount_Problem

Click on the image above or here for four-per page post card templates.

Click here for a PDF of the guidelines below:

There is no interest more special than a child’s civil right to public education, and yet Washington — a state of great prosperity and intellectual capital — has underfunded public schools for over a decade, and remains in contempt of court for failing to amply fund basic education. Maintaining a sense of urgency in fulfilling our paramount constitutional duty is difficult when it has been neglected for so many years. However, the legislature is in session until April 23, 2017, and so NOW is the time for every citizen who values a child’s civil right to public education to engage in the process of solving our state’s paramount problem.

Complete a post card by including a drawing, your child’s drawing, a fact or facts, and/or anecdotes. Your personal message should answer one or more of the following questions regarding how our state’s failure to amply fund basic education for all children in our state has affected your family, school, and/or community:

  1. How many hours have you volunteered to alleviate the challenges that large class sizes present? (ex. I volunteer X hours per week because there are 32 kids and 1 teacher in my child’s 2nd grade class)
  2. Which school supplies have you donated to a public school or schools in the past 6 years? (ex. I donate 5 reams of paper annually to my local public school)
  3. Approximately how much money have you spent on basic school supplies for your child/ren, students, or for children in your community? (ex. I spent $400 for school supplies for my children and other students in the school this year.)
  4. Approximately much time have you (teachers) spent creating DonorsChoose or other crowdfunding campaigns to raise funds to cover school or program supplies that should be provided within the definition of basic education? (I volunteer X hours per month creating crowdfunding campaigns on weekends, so that my students have access to Y books.)
  5. How much money have you (teachers) raised via DonorsChoose and other crowdfunding campaigns to fund “basic education” supplies and programs? (Via donorschoose, I raised $ to fund a literacy program for ELL students.)
  6. How many more students over the recommended class size of 1 teacher to 17 students are you teaching (for parents, how many are in your child/ren’s class/es)? (ex. My child’s K class has 7 more children than the required 17 to 1 teacher.)
  7. Is your disabled child / student receiving the services s/he needs in public school?
    (ex. My child / student needs X, which is not available because of Y.)
  8. How much money has your school’s PTA contributed to pay for staff or other basic education supplies and programs over the course of the past six years (or just in the last year)?
  9. How much has your family paid (2010-2016) for full day kindergarten? (ex. My family paid X in 2013 and Y in 2015 for full-day K)
  10. How many hours have you donated to PTAs or schools, planning fundraising events and activities to bridge the gap between legislative inaction and ample funding of basic education?
  11. Which services or in-kind donations have you donated to public schools or PTAs to assist with paying for basic educational needs of students?

Take a picture of your post card and share it in a *public* post on social media. Be sure to include the hashtags: #paramountproblem, #waleg, and #waedu. Also include your zip code (how legislators identify constituents).

Thank you for advocating for the children in our state who cannot advocate for themselves!

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